Adobe Photoshop – King of all Photo editors

Adobe Photoshop – King of all Photo editors

INTRODUCTION OF ADOBE PS: Adobe Photoshop is a raster graphics editor developed and published by Adobe Systems for macOS and Windows. Photoshop was created in 1988 by Thomas and John Knoll. Since then, it has become the de facto industry standard in raster graphics editing, such that the word "photoshop" has become a verb as in "to Photoshop an image," "photoshopping" and "photoshop contest", though Adobe discourages such use.[5] It can edit and compose raster images in multiple layers and supports masks, alpha compositing and several color models including RGB, CMYK, CIELAB, spot color and duotone. Photoshop has vast support for graphic file formats but also uses its own PSD and PSB file formats which support all the aforementioned features. In addition to raster graphics, it has limited abilities to edit or render text, vector graphics (especially through clipping path), 3D graphics and video. Photoshop's feature set can be expanded by Photoshop plug-ins, programs developed and distributed independently of Photoshop that can...
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Badminton

Badminton

Badminton is a racquet sport played using racquets to hit a shuttlecock across a net. Although it may be played with larger teams, the most common forms of the game are "singles" (with one player per side) and "doubles" (with two players per side). Badminton is often played as a casual outdoor activity in a yard or on a beach; formal games are played on a rectangular indoor court. Points are scored by striking the shuttlecock with the racquet and landing it within the opposing side's half of the court. Each side may only strike the shuttlecock once before it passes over the net. Play ends once the shuttlecock has struck the floor or if a fault has been called by the umpire, service judge, or (in their absence) the opposing side. The shuttlecock is a feathered or (in informal matches) plastic projectile which flies differently from the balls used in many other sports. In particular, the feathers create much higher drag,...
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Tesla building ‘world’s biggest’ lithium-ion battery in Australia

Tesla building ‘world’s biggest’ lithium-ion battery in Australia

Australia is famous for the Big Banana, the Big Pineapple and the Big Prawn. Now, another "world's biggest" is coming Down Under, and it's going to be just as much of a tourist attraction if Elon Musk has his way. Tesla is teaming up with French-based renewable energy company Neoen to build the world's biggest lithium-ion battery in South Australia by the end of the year. Tesla CEO Elon Musk jetted into Australia this afternoon to make the announcement, saying the battery will be "three times more powerful than anything else on earth. "The world will look at it as an example... [of] a large-scale battery application for the grid that will really take a large amount of load," he said. "This is definitely the way of the future, and I think other states will be taking a closer look at this and seeing if it's applicable to their needs. And I suspect in most cases it is." The Premier of South Australia, Jay Weatherill, announced the...
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TUNNEL DIODE

TUNNEL DIODE

TUNNEL DIODE (Esaki diode) is a type of semiconductor that is capable of very fast operation, well into the microwave frequency region, made possible by the use of the quantum mechanical effect called tunneling. It was invented in August 1957 by Leo Esaki, Yuriko Kurose and Takashi Suzuki when they were working at Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo, now known as  Sony. In 1973 Esaki received the Nobel Prize in Physics, jointly with Brian Josephson, for discovering the electron tunneling effect used in these diodes. Robert Noyce independently came up with the idea of a tunnel diode while working for William Shockley, but was discouraged from pursuing it. These diodes have a heavily doped p–n junction that is about 10 nm (100 Å) wide. The heavy doping results in a broken band gap, where conduction band electron states on the n-side are more or less aligned with valence band hole states on the p-side. Tunnel diodes were first manufactured by Sony in 1957 followed by General Electric and other...
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FIDGET SPINNER – The VIRAL toy for stress free

FIDGET SPINNER – The VIRAL toy for stress free

Fidget spinners are more popular in google search than Donald Trump and Kimkardashian combined.Here is a look at the toy that has become a global phenomenon. THE ORIGIN The fidget spinner was invented by Catherine Hettinger . Once she went to visit her sister in Israel when she heard of young boys throwing rocks at police officers and common people . She started brainstorming devices that could distract young children and provide them with a soothing toy. And the Fidget spinner was born . Hettinger held the patent on the spinners for eight years, but surrendered it in 2005 because she could not afford the $400 renewal fee . The toys(spinners) hit the mass market after the patent expired . THE TOY A fidget spinner is a small hand toy that usually has a star-like shape and three weighted end points . In the center of the spinner is a circle with ball bearings that allow the toy to spin with very...
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P-N Junction diode

P-N Junction diode

P-N junction diode : If a p-type semiconductor is combined with N-type semiconductor a junction is formed with two electrodes this is called " P-N junction diode". Symbol : Formation of depletion region at the function :   If P-N junction diode is formed , some of the holes in p-type and some of the electrons in N-type are diffuse towards each other and recombine. Due to this , narrow region is formed on either side of the junction is called " depletion region ". This region creates an electric field  and causes a potential is called " barrier potential ". This potential barrier steps further diffusion of electrons and holes .   Variation of depletion region : Forward bias : In forward bias , positive terminal of battery is connected to P-type and negative terminal is connected to N-type . Due to this , the holes and electrons are repelled and moved towards the junction . As a result , the width of deletion region decreases...
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Zener Diode – The basic building blocks of electrical circuits

Zener Diode – The basic building blocks of electrical circuits

Zener Diode : A properly doped P-N junction diode has sharp break down voltage , when operated in reverse bias is called "Zener Diode". ­  SYMBOL :   INVENTED BY :  The device was named after Clarence Melvin Zener, who discovered the Zener effect. Zener reverse breakdown is due to electron quantum tunnelling caused by a high strength electric field. USES  :    Zener Diode is used to generate low power stabilized supply rails from a higher voltage and to provide reference voltages for circuits, especially stabilized power supplies.They are also used to protect circuits from over-voltage, especially electrostatic discharge (ESD).Zener diodes are widely used in electronic equipment of all kinds and are one of the basic building blocks of electronic circuits. ZENER DIODE AS VOLTAGE REGULATOR :      " The device constant output voltage even if input voltage & load current changes is called VOLTAGE REGULATOR "  ...
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WHAT IS A DIODE ?

WHAT IS A DIODE ?

 DIODE is a electrical device which has two terminals that conducts the flow of current in only one direction; its has low resistance current to one side & high resistance to the other side. The most commonly used diode in the present generation is SEMICONDUCTOR DIODE is a crystalline piece semiconductor material with a p–n junction connected to two electrical terminals  Diode is for several types : Zener diode P-N junction diode Tunnel diode Varactor diode Schottky diode Photo diode PIN diode Laser diode Light emitting diode  ...
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AN EARTHQUAKE CHANGES WATER INTO GOLD

AN EARTHQUAKE CHANGES WATER INTO GOLD

From the recent study Scientists it is said that "EARTHQUAKE CHANGES WATER INTO GOLD".So,lets see what is it..... Water in faults vaporizes during an earthquake, depositing gold, according to a model published in the March 17 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The model provides a quantitative mechanism for the link between gold and quartz seen in many of the world's gold deposits, said Dion Weatherley, a geophysicist at the Un   iversity of Queensland in Australia and lead author of the study. When an earthquake strikes, it moves along a rupture in the ground — a fracture called a fault. Big faults can have many small fractures along their length, connected by jogs that appear as rectangular voids. Water often lubricates faults, filling in fractures and jogs. About 6 miles (10 kilometers) below the surface, under incredible temperatures and pressures, the water carries high concentrations of carbon dioxide, silica and economically attractive elements like gold. Shake, rattle and gold During an earthquake, the fault jog suddenly opens wider....
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